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Your donation will help to provide dogs to many
adults who suffer from various psychiatric disabilities
such as PTSD. The following is an example of some
of those on our waiting list.







Kelsey

Greetings and Salutations, my name is Kelsey I am a resident of Palm Springs,
California and I am 30 years old. My story began more then 6 years ago when I was a
23-year-old full time Ceramics Major, just one semester away from getting my
Bachelors of Fine Art. One day I sustained a traumatic brain injury that led to a great
number of things. I had to quit school and I am now permanently disabled. I have
several heath problems, both psychical and psychological. I suffer from PTSD, sever
anxiety and depression. Part of my PTSD includes night terrors and sleep paralysis. I
also have neck problems, concentration and memory problems, and a Pituitary tumor
that causes me to have Hypopituitarism. I am on a truck-load of medications and I
spend more time then I would like to count in doctors offices and hospitals.

Most of my time is spent however, at home. My medical issues effect my every waking
and sleeping moment. I can not drive due to my neck and more, but even if I could, I
am afraid to go anywhere by myself. I have severe anxiety about just about everything.
A service dog would greatly improve my quality of life because I would be able to try
and become more independent. This dog will help with my anxiety in public, interrupt
me when I am having an attack or a flash back, and also will help to stop the night
paralysis and night terrors. My dog will help me accomplish my dream of finishing my
degree.

I am so humbled and grateful that I have a chance for such an amazing opportunity
through Little Angels. Thank you from the bottom of my heart!

“Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life
as by the obstacles which he has overcome. -Booker T. Washington























Greg

After being discharged from active duty because of a career ending mishap, I didn’t
realize how much I was changing over time and becoming someone that I had ever
known.  I stopped going out with friends, I started to worry about crowds, people
getting too close and I even had difficulty going grocery shopping.  

I wouldn’t talk about the nightmares and cold sweats and couldn't talk about the
chronic pain. The doctors would always ask how I was doing and I would give a
soldier’s bravado type answer. I pushed myself beyond my physical limits to prove I
was still “whole” but it all came at a cost.  I lost sight of reality and was hyper vigilant,
depressed, angry, sad, and irritable.  Even then I did not care.
I went back to school and discovered that I couldn’t function very well in society.  I was
lost in military memories and always on the defensive to protect myself from
perceived threats.  Friends and family did an intervention and more than a year later
here I am asking for your help.
I opened up and got properly diagnosed and that diagnosis is helping me to recover.  
PTSD, major depression, anxiety and chronic pain are the enemies that I fight now.  
Getting a service dog will help me get to a place where I can go grocery shopping or
go to the mall with my daughter, go to school and not completely enter into panic
mode.  The dog will also improve or assist my mobility.  I walk with a cane but the dog
will have a harness to help me get up and around better.  This dog will be the friend I
can rely upon and trust.  This is a chance for me to get my life back.  The last 12 years
have been long and I need your help at making my future brighter.























Mary

I am Mary, a 25-year-old young woman attending community college and learning
independent living skills. I am blessed to have love and support from my parents,
sister and extended family.

In the first grade I was in the gifted program in school. In the third grade, I began to
have panic attacks and meltdowns daily and was unable to separate from my mother.
I began to talk about dying. At the age of ten, I was diagnosed with Depression and
Anxiety. I began taking medication and going to therapy.
I had few friends. My sense of smell, touch, and hearing were heightened and easily
overwhelmed. Friends and others teased and bullied me. I had frequent
“meltdowns.” I found social interactions and crowds difficult. Complicated
explanations or directions confused me.  When I was fifteen, I was diagnosed with
Asperger Syndrome, or Autism Spectrum Disorder and ADD.  Relationships, social
interactions, and going out in public continued to be very challenging for me. I
attended a Special Education Program during High School and while at my local
Community College. My only  friends were at the special education program at school.

Recently I have had the opportunity to move away from home and attend a special
College Internship Program for Students with Asperger Syndrome and Learning
Differences. I am learning to cook, clean, budget, and live independently while
attending classes at a local community college. At the same time I am making
friends and learning social skills with the help of mentors and therapists. I have
several staff members that support me with these learning goals. It is very
challenging for me, but I have made great progress in the year and a half I have been
here. My goal is to receive a service dog, to live independently, have lasting
friendships and make a positive contribution to my community.

I am so pleased to find an organization that provides service dogs to adults with
Autism Spectrum Disorders. Even more so, I am grateful for all the wonderful
individuals at Little Angels Service Dogs for their amazing work with very special
dogs. An Autism Assistance Dog will assist me by performing deep pressure
therapy, interrupting my night terrors (I have had these regularly since childhood), and
providing a boundary in public spaces. In more ways than can be measured, I believe
a service dog will change my life!

I have always loved dogs and can hardly wait to have the love, company and
assistance of an Assistance Dog from Little Angels Service Dogs!
Thank you so much for reading my story and considering a contribution to Little
Angels Service Dogs.




















Katie

Hello, my name is Katie, and I’m 32 years old. I have been living with Bi-Polar
Disorder all my life. It was something that I was handling rather well with medications
until I was diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder back in 2005. I have been
suffering with flashbacks, severe anxiety, phantom smells and tastes, and even night
terrors and nocturnal anxiety attacks that keep me from sleeping normally. I am now
to the point where I suffer from agoraphobia as well and rarely leave my home unless
it is with a trusted family member.  After trying everything from medications and
therapy to acupuncture, I decided that perhaps there were service dogs that could
help.  

That was when I went online and began the hunt, where I stumbled upon Little
Angels Service Dogs. My particular dog will be trained to recognize the subtle
changes that occur in my body when I am about to have a panic attack, have a night
terror, or a flashback, and will paw at my leg to interrupt the event and to ground me,
and will then perform Deep Pressure Therapy to help me calm back down.  Through
these trained tasks, my dog will help me to gain independence, leave my home
without having to rely on my family members and get out there in the world! I’ve been
missing so much and I know that with a furry new companion to walk beside me and
help me through my disorder’s challenges I can be the independent woman I’ve
been striving to be.






















Sheri

Hi. My name is Sheri. I'm 44 years old and have three grown children and five
grandchildren.

As a child growing up I was diagnosed with ADHD and put on medication. I was
hospitalized several times as a teenager and as an adult. I was diagnosed as having
Bi-Polar and PTSD, as well as an extreme anxiety disorder.  I also suffer from chronic
low back problems which makes it difficult to pick things up or to walk long distances.

I suffered years of physical, mental, and emotional abuse which has caused my
PTSD. These experiences prevent me from leaving my house without someone I trust
being by my side. Even when I have someone with me I may have a panic attack or
flashback. It has really made my life and my family's life difficult.
I usually rely on my 78 year old mother to take me places such as doctor
appointments and shopping.

A service dog will help me regain my independence. My dog will be trained to
recognize panic and anxiety attacks, and paw at my leg just as soon as they start to
redirect me before it escalates to an unbearable level, and then perform deep
pressure therapy to help alleviate my anxiety. He will be able to be placed between
other people and myself to give me some extra much needed personal space.

Regaining my independence is my greatest goal. Not only will I be able to run
errands without the aid of someone else, but will be able to attend college classes
and get involved in volunteer opportunities.

Thank you for reading about me and caring enough to be willing to donate to those in
need.





















Phoenix

My name is Phoenix, and I am a 20-year-old college student studying robotics
engineering at UCSC, which has a fantastic robotics program. I love hiking, learning,
gaming, reading, and programming! I am a hard worker, and love new experiences.

Unfortunately, I have Bipolar II disorder, and severe Complex PTSD, due to some
severe childhood abuse by my biological father. While I do see a psychiatrist and
therapist regularly, and take medication, due to the pervasive, complicated, and
intertwining natures of these disorders, it has been extremely difficult to effectively
treat. This has negatively impacted my life, making it hard to do normal, necessary
things like going to class, work, or just leave my room. I have flashbacks, anxiety,
panic attacks, depression, and mood swings. I get anxious if my back is to a door or
window, in an enclosed/confined space with only one exit, and/or if I am in a large
crowd and have no easy escape routes. If someone moves too quickly towards me, I
can have a flashback, disassociate, or have an anxiety attack.

Not only do I have to deal with the mental and emotional ramifications of this
disorder, but I also have to contend with the physical ones as well. The increased
stress levels negatively impact my health in many ways, including a immune system
that is working at less than full capacity. After talking with my doctor, disability advisor,
friends and family, I decided to apply to Little Angels Service Dogs. When I was
accepted into the program, it felt like the sun was shining through the clouds for me!
A service dog can help increase my independence, and mitigate my disability enough
that I can fully live my life again. Being able to stop night terrors, bring me out of a
flashback, and calm me from anxiety attacks are just a few of the many things a
service dog can do to help improve my life. It is a partnership that would mean so
much to me, and my ability to be myself again. With a service dog at my side, the
chances of me being able to graduate will rise by a large percentage, and I will be
able to be a more functional, and productive member of society again.

I am so appreciative to Little Angels Service Dogs for giving me this chance, and to
anyone who is reading this just for taking the time to read my story.

“I am not what happened to me, I am what I choose to become.” ­ Carl Gustav Jung






















Joanna

Hi my name is Joanna. I am a 35 year old struggling with depression, panic attacks,
and PTSD. I have been on a lot of medications and none of them really help. I have
been hospitalized numerous times. At times my symptoms are so bad I can’t even
get out of bed or leave the house.

I recently found Little Angels after researching so many websites. They will be able to
train a dog to alert to my different symptoms. When I have a panic attack they will train
the dog to recognize my symptoms and paw at my leg to interrupt the attack, and then
to provide deep pressure therapy to help orient me. They can also train the dog to
provide non-protective boundary control to assist me in public.

Through training with my dog it will get me to be more social and hopefully be able to
go out and get a job. My dog will help me have a brand new look on life.























Frankie

I am Frankie, a 21-year-old young woman finishing my Bachelor’s degree.

I have Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, and "moderate to severe"
Depression, as well as Borderline Personality Disorder (also called Emotional
Intensity Disorder).  I have been struggling with these three for my entire life, but was
diagnosed and placed on medication at the age of 14.  The conditions are becoming
worse with age.  At this point, I feel as though the medications may be intensifying the
disorders by creating such heavy dependencies on drugs as a treatment.  The
medications have transformed my personality, but my body is dependent upon them,
leaving me to live between a rock and hard place - being myself versus being
mentally stable.  

I have undergone specialized therapies for all of my illnesses, although I continue to
struggle with all them every single day.  I got engaged in February to a wonderful
young man.  We are college sweethearts, and he is incredibly understanding,
knowledgeable, and supportive toward my many complications.  Together, we are
committed to getting me to the point where I can lead a normal life that is either
completely or almost prescription-drug-free.  Currently, I am overly reliant on Kevin as
a sort of service companion, who suppresses me physically for anxiety and panic
attacks. But Kevin cannot be around every moment of everyday, nor should he have to
be.

I am working hard to bring the medications back down, attending therapy weekly, and
journaling my experiences.  I have finally found the will to battle these diseases. I am
going to save my life! My goal is to receive a service dog for my disorders, and I will
lead a healthy life as the intelligent, hard-working, and spirited young woman that I
am.
























Jody

My name is Jody and I am a 43-year-old single mother of 3 grown boys. I was first
diagnosed with Bi-Polar Type II disorder several years ago.  For a while I tried
different medications with no results.  My frustrations got the best of me and I decided
to stop trying medications and “just deal with the problems.”  Fortunately, at the time,
my episodes were manageable and easily kept under control. My luck ended a
couple of years ago when the episodes started spiraling out of control both in
frequency and level.

To date, new issues are continuously adding to what I have to deal with on a daily
basis. Most recently, I have been diagnosed with PTSD due to an abusive marriage.  
For those of you who are not aware, Bi-Polar disorder has various levels; I am
characterized as a Rapid Cycler, sometimes plagued with severe anxiety to the point
where I am terrified just to get out of bed.

I still have not been able to find a medication that can help me, mostly due to the
severe side effects, so I have turned to therapy to address my disorder. This is
helping, but by no means the answer.

Anyone who knows me will tell you I am an extremely independent person, and my
continued independence is very important to me. Unfortunately with all the issues I
am having, I am at serious risk of losing this.

I have every faith a well-trained service dog will help prevent this from happening. The
dog can help me with the nightmares, so I can get better sleep. With deep pressure
therapy, it will help me through the anxiety, so I can have a normal day. It will help
distract me  from my depression meltdowns with a trained alert behavior so they will
not be as severe or last as long. And just having to function well enough to meet the
dog’s daily needs will help me stay motivated and focused. I have no problem letting
myself suffer, but I will never let anyone or anything go without because of me. It just
isn’t in my nature, no matter how hard it might be.

I am very excited and hopeful to have the opportunity to have such a special friend in
my life.

Thank you for your support!



























David

My name is David, I’m 27 years old, and I have been having a rough time. Since my
early teens, depression and anxiety have wreaked havoc on my life. Despite being
academically inclined, these disorders have thwarted so many of my attempts at
completing my education that I have given up. Various self-employment ventures
have achieved modest success, but they are always quickly dismantled by my
instability; the panics, and anxieties that lead into depression. Precisely the sorts of
issues that a service dog can help me to stabilize.

Three years ago, as I was beginning to finally get a handle on my situation, an ill-
advised series of medical interventions went terribly awry. I was traumatized.
Throwing PTSD into the mix has made my situation unmanageable.

I have been considering a service dog for quite some time, but only recently
overcame my feelings of unworthiness. Accepting that, as much as it hurts me, it
causes me to hurt others. Those I care about most; though not with physical violence.
Once I am triggered, I distrust everyone, and I fear for my life. Having a service animal
will mitigate the anger and rage of feeling backed into a corner. I won’t be alone.

The strain all of this has put on my family and few remaining friends has been
tremendous and is only matched by the shame I feel at my behavior when it is
recounted to me (I rarely remember the particulars of an outburst.) Worse, I am not
always aware that I have been triggered until it is too late. The dog, however, can
interrupt the process by alerting and intervening before my internal state spins
completely out of control.

Finally, I strongly believe that a service dog is my last, best hope of achieving self-
sufficiency. I have delayed my SSI disability paperwork a long time now, because I am
still determined not to need it. Relief from some of the stress, fear, and anxieties will
empower me to use my skills productively. Medication and therapy have failed me,
but I believe a specially trained dog will be the answer.




















Victor

My name is Victor.  For the past 18 years I have been a resident of Santa Monica,
California. On June 7, 2013 I found myself in the middle of a mass shooting at Santa
Monica College. I escaped physically unharmed, but two months later I began
experiencing difficulty sleeping, intrusive memories and night terrors of that horrific
day. My doctor believed I was displaying the symptoms of PTSD and referred me to a
psychiatrist for further evaluation. As I was leaving the doctor’s office I was caught in
the middle of a high speed police chase and shooting. I again found myself having to
hide in order to stay alive. Those two traumatic events triggered many painful
memories for me, memories I had been avoiding since childhood.   


Currently I am diagnosed with Complex PTSD, sometimes referred as disorder of
extreme stress. This type of PTSD is found among individuals who have been
exposed to prolong traumatic circumstances, such as childhood sexual abuse.
Treatment of my diagnosis takes a long period of time and may progress at a slower
rate.  My treatment requires a sensitive and highly structured treatment program
delivered by a team of trauma specialists. The psychological effects of the trauma I
suffered as a child were intense. They shattered my innocence, in turn creating a loss
of faith and belief that there is any safety, predictability, or meaning in the world. It
involved utter disillusionment and feelings that no matter where I went, I was unable
to find a safe place to retreat.  Due to the overwhelming and shocking nature of the
traumatic events of my past and present, these horrible events have not been able to
be processed by my mind or body like other experiences are; they are not integrated
or digested. I am left with haunting memories, flashbacks, night terrors, body
memories, phantom smells, extreme hypersensitivity, and hyper-vigilance.  I'm on
24/7.  I cannot reset or reboot and I am left feeling exhausted, depleted, depressed
and extremely isolated. Being hyper alert to danger at all times has had its toll
physically, emotionally and mentally. Physically my body is shutting down. Before this
physical deterioration all stemming from my complex PTSD, I was an active,
successful, creative and productive individual.
I was a general contractor, caterer, and a sound engineer for live events. I was heavily
involved in my church and spent most of my talents and gifts there. I spent my off-
times as an extreme kayaker. I was a very busy and high energy individual. This is no
longer the case. I avoid people, crowded areas, restaurants and movie theaters.
Shopping for food is extremely difficult. I spend most my time at doctors’
appointments for myself and my partner. I see a therapist three times a week.  I have
been dealing with PTSD symptoms my whole life. I learned to survive by using coping
and defense mechanisms. I am not a victim, I am a survivor, but I continue to be
traumatized by these horrific events in my life. I have come to the realization the only
positive and healthy option for me at this time is the blessing of a service dog to
assist me in my daily routine as well as integrate me back into society as a
productive, independent and well-adjusted individual.

A service dog would provide a non-protective buffering in front and behind me in
crowded spaces and also to check around corners. My service dog will also be
trained in the task of about-face as well as to check for intruders, to assist my eyes
and ears while I sleep so I may finally get some rest.  Most importantly my service
dog will interrupt panic attacks. A service dog would help me get back into the
world, break up my severe isolation, and help me stay calm during frequent trips to
the store, doctor appointments and walks. A service dog would help me to create a
bond and companionship that I can trust so that I may learn to trust others.
I truly believe this would help me to interact and socialize with people again. My
service dog will provide 24 / 7 therapy and companionship, we would be a team.  
Telling my story has been a difficult cathartic process, but very necessary in order to
move forward in life. Thank you for your interest and support; you are all little angels to
me.























Abigail

My name is Abby, and I’m 20 years old. Only a few months ago I had no idea what the
word ‘agoraphobia' meant, nor what it would mean to me. Growing up I was shy, even
cripplingly so, and as I got older it only got more intense. I was sometimes made to
think it was shameful; I couldn’t operate like others could in public. I began to wonder
if I had an actual issue.

That was where my hunt began. I came across online articles describing anxiety and
agoraphobia, and I fit the bill perfectly. After seeking the second opinion of a
wonderful psychologist I began my journey to receiving a service dog to allow me to
get on with my life.

A service dog will be trained to recognize my anxiety just as it starts, and can interrupt
me by pawing at my leg so I can refocus on the dog before it escalates to a painful
level. My dog will be able to perform non-protective boundary control, to help give me
more personal space in crowded situations, and will be able to perform deep
pressure therapy to help ease the anxieties I suffer from. This dog will truly be a life-
changer for me.

Thank you for making this dream a reality!

























Ashley

Hello, my name is Ashley and I am 21-years-old .My psychological diagnosis is
Borderline Personality Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Major Depressive
Disorder, and a phobia of breaking ankles.  I also have multiple physical issues
including chronic back pain, chronic migraines and tremors.

I’ve had mental struggles for as long as I can remember.  I grew up with an alcoholic
father who was mentally abusive.  I was extremely shy my entire childhood.  I was
afraid to go into my fenced in back yard unless my mom was with me.  I struggled
with feeling worthless.  I had extremely low self-confidence.  I hated myself.
The struggles continued as I grew older, progressively getting worse.  I started having
horrible meltdowns.  My anxiety became so bad I would become physically ill for
weeks at a time.  My mood swings began to wreak havoc on my relationships.
Now, I am unable to work.  I am unable to go to college.  I can’t even go shopping by
myself without having a panic attack.  I’ve withdrawn from most human interactions.  I
rarely see the few remaining friends I have.  The time I do spend outside of the house
usually consists of doctor appointments.  Sometimes the only things that keep me
going are my pets.

That’s why I know a service dog would change my life for the better.  A service dog
would give me courage to do things that I currently can’t even consider doing.  It
would help me through mood swings and panic attacks.  It would give me the
independence that I can only dream about right now.  My goal is to one day go back to
work and school.  My dream is to become a doctor.  With a service dog, that dream
will become a reality!



























Samantha

My name is Samantha and I am 24 years old, and  suffer horribly from panic attacks
and severe social anxiety. It’s brought my life to a full halt, being too anxiety ridden to
attend school or leave the house without someone with me. I usually get panic
attacks while I’m driving, making it impossible for me to go anywhere that takes more
than twenty minutes.

A service dog would help mitigate my anxiety and panic attacks while in the car and in
social situations allowing me to be independent and not so reliant on my family. My
dog will be trained to recognize my panic and anxiety and paw at my leg to interrupt
me, allowing me to focus on the dog through another task called Deep Pressure
Therapy.  Having a service dog would change my life around and I could finally begin
to enjoy my life to the fullest.























Erin

Greetings!  My name is Erin and I appreciate you taking the time to learn a bit about
my story.  I’ve been in medical treatment since I was a teenager for depression and
anxiety.  In 2012 I had a series of panic attacks and traumatic flashbacks so severe I
was hospitalized.  There I was diagnosed with PTSD and severe anxiety in addition to
my depression.  

I am a rape and sexual assault survivor several times over with PTSD, flashbacks,
panic attacks, and migraines. A Service Dog  through Little Angels will give me a
positive and trusting relationship to build on, and a better connection with my
environment. There are days I don’t leave the house.  There are days I need to go to
the grocery but can’t work up the courage without a friend to escort me.   My quality of
life, my interactions with the world, will improve with a Service Dog by my side.

I love animals.  Bringing a Service Animal into my family will be such a blessing.   
With my panic attacks and flashbacks, sometimes something as simple as physical
pressure or company can slow it down, maybe even stop the panic. The dog will be
trained to paw at my leg when he or she notices my anxiety or depression, even
before I do,  and this will allow me take a moment for my dog to perform deep
pressure therapy, which can prevent the attack before it gets painful.  I can go out and
do proper grocery shopping without waiting for a friend who can go with me, as my
Service Partner will be there!  

Thank you for your support!   



























Tiffany

My name is Tiffany and I am in need of a service dog. I have been struggling with
mental illness for 8 years now. I have been diagnosed with Bipolar disorder, Panic
Attack Disorder and PTSD. To add to that I am also partially blind (blind in my right
eye and partially in my left).  Because of my disabilities I don't go out of the house
much unless I have my boyfriend or another friend with me. I can't take public
transportation or go to the mall or grocery store unless I'm with my boyfriend because
of my anxiety. I can't go to some of my friends' parties because I will have a panic
attack because of all the people.I believe that a service dog would give me
independence and would allow me to do the things I am unable to do now. A service
dog would be trained to perform medical alert to interrupt me when my anxiety is just
starting to rise, and then to perform deep pressure therapy which will help ground me
and give me an overall sense of calm. My dog will even be trained to perform non-
protective boundary control which provides more personal space in crowded
situations. When I give my dog the signal they will calmly move between me and the
crowd and lie down to provide a physical barrier of space.  I would love to have my life
back and a service dog will help me achieve this. Thank you for your support!



























Vanessa

Hello there, my name is Vanessa. I am 22 years old and have recently been officially
diagnosed with PTSD and social anxiety disorder. Ever since I can remember I have
struggled with being highly sensitive and anxious, as well as going through bouts of
depression on and off. I grew up with two alcoholic parents that loved me very much
but lacked the ability to express and show their love. I remember playing outside a lot
as a kid, and almost always found solace in my pets throughout childhood but as I
grew up and started middle school I had another rather large set back.

When I was 13 and just about to enter high school, my circle of the closest friends I
had ever known decided to turn their backs on me. They "cyber-bullied" me by instant
messaging me all at once (about 5 of my best friends) and told me nasty things such
as; "you should just go kill yourself," "you are ugly and should not be alive." While at
the time I was severely distraught, I didn't realize until more recently the effects this
event had on me.

While receiving little support as a child in the face of the family dysfunction, and then
losing the "support" I thought I had through my closest friends I started spiraling
down into a depression I still have yet to pull myself out of. As I entered high school
what once was considered shyness became severe fears of others my age. Fear for
what they would do, what they would say, what they would think of me. As I started to
become consumed by these fears I was sexually abused in my freshman year right in
the classroom. I was too afraid to tell anyone for years, I was afraid they would blame
me for not having done anything to get away from it, for not having done anything to
save myself, for not having been good  enough to get away from it.

I made many "close" friends over the years that came and went - always my fears of
what could happen consuming my ability to perceive reality in a logical/realistic
perspective. When I turned 17 I started working as a kennel attendant taking care of
sick dogs, and boarding dogs. I had never had a dog growing up, and getting a
chance to take care of so many dogs made me so happy. It made me realize that
animals, unlike humans, can't judge you, and don't hurt you intentionally. I found that I
could completely trust a dog/animal over a person any day.

On March 3rd 2014 I moved to Washington state to start attending university for my
bachelors in clinical psychology. This has been my passion since I was little, and I
can't wait to finish school and get into the field and start helping people! I had always
been searching, and attempting to find therapists covered by my insurance that I felt
could help me, but it was to no avail until I came to Washington. I found a good
therapist and started seeing her once a week. Soon I found out what I already knew
deep down, but didn't want to acknowledge: I had post-traumatic stress disorder from
all the physical, sexual, and verbal abuse I had encountered over the years, and I also
had social anxiety. While I continue to see my therapist I am still greatly limited by my
disabilities.  I have always continued to push on through everything, even when the
stress is unbearable. How do my disabilities affect me? I'll give you a brief overview;
every day on my way into school I worry what people will think of me, sometimes the
fear rises up in my stomach and throat and heart so much that I want to turn right
around and just go back to sleep because it would be so much safer and easier not
to have to see anyone or worry if I'm an imposition to them. Every waking hour that I
am with another person, be it a family member, a significant other, or a best friend I
worry about being a burden on them. I go over and over the different things they might
be thinking about me, and try to not say anything that might offend. I live through a lot
of flashbacks from my traumatic experiences, and often times this causes me to
assume the worst in people, and thus avoid them completely. My PTSD causes me to
have episodes, and become triggered when someone gets in my face, or starts
yelling at me, or when anything around me gets physically intense.  My disabilities
keep me from seeking the opportunities in school, and life that I would love to partake
in. They keep me from becoming close to many people, and they keep me from being
happy in my life.

Getting a service dog for me, would mean everything. It would mean a lifetime of love
and support from that dog - it would mean getting me out of my shell and into the
world again, into life, and into living that life. Getting a service dog for me means
getting a best friend. A best friend who will never judge me if I'm terrified to talk to
someone because of the burden I might place on them, a best friend who loves me
when I feel no one else possibly could, a best friend who wants to be there to support
me, and help me, a best friend who will never leave my side. Thank you so much for
taking the time to read my story.

Be happy, be blessed,

Vanessa



























Alex

Hello, my name is Alex and I am 29 years old. I am an extremely active person and
have struggled tremendously since my senior year of high school with major
depression, having resulted in countless hospitalizations. I am a strong-willed
person who never gives up but suffers immensely. I do struggle, but am a good,
intense fighter too. Never a quitter. There are days that I fear for my life and face a
hard internal emotional battle, however I fight with passion for each additional day on
this earth.

I am greatly supported by my family and friends. I look to have more confidence and
feelings of comfort in my community with a service dog. I need the assistance that a
service dog can provide where no one but myself sees, my home. I struggle getting
up in the morning due to the heavy sedation from my multiple medications. I
developed debilitating anxiety when preparing to go to work, school or any activity
outside of my front door. I struggle with long, sad days that an animal can easily
sense and offer comfort.

I have dedicated a tremendous amount of time for most of my life to everyone I find
dear to my heart. I completed 1,000 hours at my local veterinary hospital every
Saturday in high school. I have been a field hockey coach, a swim coach and a camp
director. I became a volunteer EMT-B wanting to give back to the community that has
helped raise the person I am today. I have a Bachelors in Science in Interdisciplinary
Studies: Issues in Community Health from University of Maryland Baltimore County
and just completed my Masters of Arts in Athletic Administration and Leadership at
Goucher College. I am a hard worker and want so much to have a happy, successful
life in every way.

It is today that I recognize the help that I need from my support group. I am dedicated
to achieving success and feel a service dog provides that additional guidance and
strength that I need and require to survive in this world. I have never been one to ask
for help, rather always giving. My illness has taken much of the joy in my life. I wish to
remain a strong, determined individual who needs just a little help. I want to continue
to reach milestones and see my family and friends grow into wonderful people.

I am thrilled to be receiving a service dog. A service dog would be able to save my life.
I have so many dreams and aspirations to accomplish in the future. I want them with
all my heart. I need to use every tool in the toolbox to continue to push through and
continue to beat this illness. I am excited to know that my dog and I will take great
care of each other, and together we will be able to handle any challenges while I
continue to pursue my dreams.






























Laura

Hi, I’m Laura.  I’m 23-years-old and was diagnosed with PTSD shortly after I was
hospitalized last summer.

While I have dealt with anxiety and other issues in the past on my own and with
therapy, at a certain point it began to take over my life. I would go long periods of time
without sleeping well because of nightmares or I will wake up feeling terrified and
sick. The lack of sleep did not help the sudden struggle that learning, retaining
information, and recalling suddenly became for me. There are also things that trigger
panic attacks which are very difficult to avoid in every day life and really do not actually
pose a risk most of the time. Sometimes it’s the way someone is dressed, a specific
area, a specific sound, a sudden memory remembered, or situation, but other times I
can’t quite pinpoint why my body feels like it’s shutting down.

Though I have worked with a few specialists and tried different things, I am still
struggling specifically with nightmares and panic attacks, as well as being sad and
anxious in general. I want to be able to spend time with friends and family and
actually enjoy it without suddenly becoming unable to really be there. I would like to
be able to be more stable and more myself again and I truly believe that a service dog
trained to assist me would help achieve this. My dog would help set boundaries
when necessary, eventually redirect my attention when I am about to have a panic
attack, and help me recover from nightmares and ground me more quickly.




























Jessica

Hi, my name is Jessica and I have diagnoses of bipolar 1, OCD, generalized anxiety
disorder, and panic disorder with agoraphobia. I've been dealing with the bulk of
these challenges for a little over two years now, but they were creeping up on me for a
few years before that. I used to take pride in accepting new responsibility and
excelling, but I am no longer able to work or attend school. I was on track to move up
the ladder at work and complete a Bachelor of Arts in English, but now it's a huge
accomplishment if I avoid having a panic attack during a family shopping outing.

Despite being on four medications and attending therapy, I still have trouble coping
with basic life skills and interactions. Having a service dog will be an excellent tool to
add to my current coping mechanisms; I look forward to partnering with my dog and
learning to live more fully again.




























Olivia

Growing up, Olivia was always moving around the country with her large military
family. She landed in Tucson, Arizona after her father retired from the army. Now, she
is a college student following her career passion to be a sign language interpreter.
After studying, she has fun making soap and jewelry, and spending time with her
family dog teaching him new tricks. Olivia’s always been an animal-lover and says, “I
used to dog-sit for other people until my anxiety became too much.”

Olivia was diagnosed with depression and agoraphobia when she was 15 caused by
years of bullying. At age 18, she suffered assault, and was diagnosed with post-
traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). “This is something that has affected me for a long
time. I have gone through a lot of therapy and a lot of medications that have certainly
helped, but they only do so much,” said Olivia.

Due to her anxiety, depression, and PTSD, Olivia had to drop out of public school
when she was 16 to finish high school at home. “At one point, my anxiety was so
severe I didn’t take a single step out of my front door for three months,” said Olivia. “I
had to drop college courses due to anxiety, which is slowing down my degree plan. I
feel this is slowing down my life.” Olivia can’t enjoy the simple things or
independence of going to the movies, going out to eat, or shopping without worrying
about how many people will be there. “I miss out on a lot of fun opportunities
because of the anxiety and PTSD,” said Olivia.

Little Angels will train Olivia’s pup to recognize her symptoms, and apply deep
pressure therapy to help reorient her to her surroundings. “ I hope that getting a
service dog along with going to therapy will help speed up the process of recovery,”
said Olivia. “I am hoping that with a service dog, I will regain my independence and
get my life back on track.”






























Hi, my name is Kara and I’m 21 years old. I’ve been battling severe depression and
anxiety since I was a freshman in high school. I struggled with self-harm as a senior,
but thought that would stop with a change in scenery and going to college to study
what I love; Art. I was wrong, however, and continued to struggle even more with self-
harm and suicidal thoughts. I ended up dropping out within the first quarter.

I began seeing a therapist and tried to go back to school in the fall of 2015 but was
unable to keep up and left again in April of 2016.  During the spring/summer of 2016,
I was hospitalized twice and participated in two outpatient programs. I have tried
several medications but nothing has helped. Even with the help of my therapist,
psychiatrist, and the support of my family, I have not been able to move forward in life.
My depression and anxiety have disabled me to the point where I can’t continue my
education, I can’t keep a job and I rely on my parents for everything.  

On my best day, I know I have great potential to be whatever I want to be, but those
days are rare and even then I struggle with suicidal thoughts.

I know a psychiatric service dog will help me keep those thoughts from becoming
actions and allow me to live an independent and fulfilling life.
Help support those who suffer
from psychiatric disabilities today!